Chox - Chocoholics only

why Chox


Chox - Chocoholics only

Why Chox?

 

Why a chocolate cream?


Because it was much needed!
And because, probably the best way to taste chocolate is when it emulsifies with water, when the taste of a teaspoon of chocolate cream magically expands the fine cocoa aroma across the entire mouth.
Eating a square of fine chocolate and waiting for it to melt in order to feel its good taste takes too long. Indeed, during this process, the mouth receptors saturate and the taste experience is not at its best.
Hence, Chox started its research and discovered that water, whose content is almost 45% in Chox products, not only does not reduce the pleasure of tasting, but it actually doubles it!

 

Is chocolate cream necessarily a spread?

When we talk about chocolate cream, we associate it with spreads. However, why would a chocolate cream need to be eaten with bread, whether fresh or toasted?
One possible answer could be that the fat or perhaps sticky consistency of spreads requires a piece of bread: who would eat a tablespoon of butter without a dry accompaniment to lighten the texture?
Chox is a chocolate cream made with water, it is light and low-fat, so it can be eaten by itself, without bread. You can also eat Chox with bread of course, or any other sweet or savoury food with a similar aromatic quality.

 

Instructions...


Hot, cold, or just right… Chox breaks the rules. While we’re used to keep some foodstuffs in the fridge, we keep others like chocolate in the pantry, even for a very long time... But no food will stay fresh and crisp forever and it’s always better to eat fresh.

- Chox from the fridge is a real treat in summer, both refreshing and surprising: who would have thought of eating chocolate when it’s scorching hot outside?

- Chox is creamy, light and delicious if you eat it 30 minutes after taking it out from the fridge.

- Chox is great in winter, after being heated in the microwave or by bain marie, as it turns into an unparalled hot chocolate. Without milk.

You can choose between different flavours: dark, coffee, or jasmine green tea, just like Francesco Redi used to savour back in the Medici days.

"Como agua para chocolate" (Like Water for Chocolate) is a Latin American expression with several deep, entwined and even controversial meanings. Ranging from passion, to excitement, to total union. This expression suggests that chocolate cannot be mixed with water. However, Mexicans used to do it in the past, and today Chox does it too… this means that there is a way to do it and this can be done ;-)

 

Cocoa or Chocolate?


They are not the same thing... There is some ambiguity regarding these terms that causes confusion. Cocoa is the name of the seed contained in its pod (Cabosse) that once worked from fermentation to conching becomes chocolate.

However, Cocoa is also the precious powder that chocolatiers and pastry chefs use to bake cakes or sweets stuffed with chocolate. It is easy then to think that everything comes from the powder, while few know that the seeds of cocoa contain, besides the aromatic part, a consistent cocoa butter (noble fat, rich in antioxidants and free from cholesterol). This butter is usually removed from cocoa seed with a process that uses high pressure.

The result is cocoa powder on one side and cocoa butter on the other. You would think… why everyone uses the powder without cocoa butter to make chocolate? When the cocoa butter is removed, the powder undertakes a process where one or more fats are added immediately to it. These fats could be butter or hydrogenated fats (the real food scam of the last century) or the controversial palm oil that has been widely criticised recently.

Perhaps there is not a right answer; it could be that it has always been done in this way or maybe that selling the cocoa butter to produce lipsticks is more profitable....

Chox, of course, would never separate the noble fat, to later add another fat...Chox usesdirectly natural, wholesome and high quality chocolate.

 

Does Cocoa grow on the ground or on trees?


Nowadays, there are no seasons for fruits and vegetables, and many people don’t know the origin of products.

You can eat chocolate your entire life without even knowing where it comes from, how it's made, how it is produced... The cocoa plant grows in tropical regions, where the seasonality is relative, so its tree blooms and bears fruit periodically.

The presence of sun together with humidity is essential for the quality of cocoa. It also is interesting to know that the presence of banana trees is important too: with their height, they create the shade that the cocoa tree needs – the cocoa tree, with its colored cocoa pods, doesn’t get higher than 3 m maximum.

 

Criollo vs. Forastero, Good vs Bad


It’s normal that the quality of the harvest is linked to the care taken during the cultivation process: the best crops are usually the most delicate. This is valid for coffee, as we know that more work and care are needed for fragrant Arabica, compared to the more bitter Robusta blend. The same goes for Criollo cocoa, an aromatic renowned variety that gets easily damaged by bugs and adverse weather conditions. On the other hand we have the Forastero cocoa variety: strong, resistant and above all, cheap, but it has the downside of having a bitter and weak flavour.

Up until the 19th century there were more plantations of Criollo than Forastero, but due to heavy industrialisation and the need to increase production, companies have favoured the cheaper variety, despite its lower quality. As a result, all the living generations have only known Forastero cocoa, with Criollo cultivars almost going extinct.

Fortunately, some virtuous companies like Domori have focused their efforts in bringing back to the market some nearly lost varieties of cocoa. Such initiatives marked the beginning of a new promising era. Today the world production of cocoa is still dominated by Forastero (90% of the global production, but mostly found in Africa): the remaining 10% is shared between Central American Criollo and Trinitario (a cross-breed of the two), for the joy of connoisseurs and pleasure seekers.

 

Dark or....bitter. That's wrong!


Our opinion on chocolate, based only on the Forastero, the market standard, has led us to a wrong belief, which has proven to be fast.

Who said that dark chocolate is necessarily bitter? This opinion comes from those who didn’t have the chance to taste fine chocolates like Criollo or Trinitario, which have such low levels of bitterness that it’s not necessary to add lots of sugar to them.

What about the idea that the darker the chocolate, the better it is?

This is another belief that needs to be changed.

Quality chocolate has a brown colour, with copper shades, while it’s Forastero chocolate the darkest one, with a colour verging to black. Another contemporary misconception is that good chocolate is not only the dark and bitter one, but also has the highest cocoa percentage, which is wrongly equalled to quality.

There’s a whole new world to discover.

 

Milk?


Milk damages the aromas of chocolate. Milk chocolate is one of the most common varieties, sold in form of bars, snacks, Easter eggs and many more. Especially when targeting children chocolate producers promote milk chocolate, supporting sweetness over bitterness. This doesn’t come as a surprise given the appeal of a sticky and sweet spreads for children, compared to bitter, dark chocolate, which couldn’t stand the competition.

A chocolate connoisseur wouldn’t favour milk chocolate, given the fact that milk and other flavourings are often used to hide the low quality of the cocoa and poor, substandard flavour.

Chox is a chocolate with water, an element that naturally improves aroma and the whole taste experience, making it possible to keep the addition of sugar at minimum. During tasting events you’ll be surprised to see that the majority of children and almost all adults prefer the Crema Dark (made with dark chocolate) to the Crema Soft (which has a bit of white chocolate in it).

 

Quantitative consumption vs.  Vs. Qualitative consumption


Chocolate has a great comforting, almost magical power, to cheer us up and make us feel good again, in a stress- and worry-free place of our own.

When we are in such a good place, it’s unlikely that we’ll turn over the chocolate bar to check if there are any hydrogenated fats, pork derivatives, aromas, palm oil or other nasty surprises. It’s more likely that we’ll just focus on the enjoyment of a piece of branded chocolate, of a known origin, and appreciate its notes – without exaggerating with the quantities.

The main difference between high quality and low quality chocolate is that the experience with the former is that of degustation, while with the latter the experience is more basic, focused on sole consumption, without overdoing it. Chox managed to rxcanada24.com/adderall merge qualitative and quantitative consumption and created chocolate creams that are pure yet delicious and enjoyable.

 

Hot, cold, or just right...


- Chox breaks the rules. While we’re used to keep some foodstuffs in the fridge, we keep others in the pantry, even for a very long time…. But no food will stay fresh and crisp forever and it’s always better to eat fresh.

- Chox from the fridge is a real treat in summer, both refreshing and surprising: who would have thought of eating chocolate when it’s scorching hot outside?

- Chox is creamy, light and delicious if you eat 30 minutes after taking it out from the fridge.

- Chox is great in winter, after being heated in the microwave or by bain marie, as it turns into an unparalled hot chocolate. No milk is needed, but you can choose between different flavours: dark, coffee, or jasmine green tea, just like Francesco Redi used to savour it in the Medici age.

 

Chox's X


We don’t put our label on the back of the products, in small print, but proudly on the front. In this way it’s easy to read our ingredients, listed in a clear and honest way.

It’s immediately clear in fact what Chox doesn’t use, and it’s our careful selection of ingredients that brought the orange “X” in our name. The “X” stands for all that is not included in our recipes, but that unfortunately is often found in other foodstuffs available on the market.

Chox doen't use preseratives, flavourungs, hydrogenated fats, palm oil gluten, acids, colorants or additives, but just chocolate, EVO, dark unrefined sugar, minerl water, coffe, tea, candied fruit and peel, and almonds and all ingredients are characterised by execellent quality.

end faq